And we're back...

We apologise we've been off the air for a while.  We've been working on some technical issues but now we're back.  There has been a lot going on in the wool industry and we want to reassure people we remain fully engaged with animal health and welfare.  Without healthy, happy sheep we have no livelihood and we are confident Australian wool growers have the utmost commitment to their animals.  

In the coming weeks we'll be updating readers with our work on sheep health and welfare.  We'll also be specifically addressing concerns of animal cruelty in the shearing industry.  The brutal treatment of sheep in any circumstances is horrifying and completely unacceptable.  We again ask every one involved with sheep (and animals in general) to be accountable and call out bad behaviour when they see it.   

Australian wool growers are proud of their industry and as a group we expect all livestock to be treated with respect - only then can we maintain our pride in the work we do.

Animal Health and Welfare a Top Priority for the Wool Industry

The Australian wool industry takes concerns about sheep health and welfare seriously. One example of this are the actions of Australian Wool Innovation (AWI) and their efforts to prevent flystrike in sheep.  AWI held an industry forum on the 20th August to provide an update on the research and development programs into flystrike prevention.  Since 2005, AWI has invested $27 million on behalf of growers to find better ways to prevent flystrike.  Click here to see the slides from the presentations made at the forum. 

 

Did you know an outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease would cost Australia around $52 billion over 10 years?

Effective biosecurity is everyone's business!

There are a huge number of animal health and welfare programs and projects WoolProducers Australia are involved in on behalf of industry.  Many of these projects focus on specialist programs with the aim to prevent, minimalise or manage biosecurity threats.  

Australia is currently FMD-free and we plan to keep it that way.  However, if FMD were to arrive in Australia, the negative health, welfare and economic impacts would be gigantic to say the least.  FMD is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals.  Australia has extremely strict quarantine controls to help prevent entry of FMD into Australia. 

In the event of an outbreak, it is estimated it would cost Australia around $52 billion over 10 years.  On behalf of industry, WoolProducers Australia and partners including Sheepmeat Council of Australia and Animal Health Australia manage the risk assessment and response to a potential FMD incursion.  

Exercise Odysseus, a nation-wide simulated response to an FMD outbreak in the form of a livestock standstill has been running over the last year.  By running a simulation, and testing communications and logistics, the livestock industries can be better prepared for an FMD response - the impact will still be large but this kind of exercise will assist in identifying the greatest risks, and finding better ways of responding to such a crisis. More info here

Animal health and welfare is of the utmost importance to Australian wool growers and WoolProducers Australia is working hard to assist growers with this outcome in mind.  Healthy sheep are productive, which in turn brings better returns to the grower.  

(photo credit: Nicole Burns, Millthorpe, NSW)

Are you a sheep shutterbug?! 

Do you like to take photos of your mob when you're out in the paddock?  

At WoolProducers, we know wool and sheep growers are committed to excellent animal health and welfare.  We want to encourage growers to take photos of their everyday activities so we can showcase the great work being done by producers Australia-wide.  Those photos might show the land and sheep that you see everyday, but some of our readers may have never seen anything like it.  Help us spread the good word about Australian wool growers and how they really do care about their livestock.

Here's what to do:

Make sure you tell us your name so we can correctly attribute the photo.

Tell us a bit about yourself - for example, where you farm, what you run, how long have you been at it, and so forth.

Attach high resolution photo(s)

Hit send!  admin@woolproducers.com.au                        


photo credit: Anne Rosewarne

 

Is Ovine Brucellosis (OB) a concern in your area?

Have a look at this video sponsored by WoolProducers and the Sheepmeat Council to see a case study on how OB was managed in the Mallee.

 

 

WoolProducers and Sheepmeat Council have partnered on several different education and infomation videos that highlight best practice animal health and welfare. 

More to come soon!

 

Australian Wool: the Fibre of Football

Shearers, woolgrowers, agents and sheep studs are uniting to celebrate the rich heritage connecting the wool industry and Australian Rules Football.

If you havent seen this wonderful video celebrating community, footy and wool, have a look!

 

 

 

Industry Re-emphasises Support for Current Mob-Based ID, Rejects Mandatory RFIDs

Read Terry Sim's story at sheepcentral.com on the overwhelming rejection by industry of mandatory RFIDs for sheep and goats here                               

Identification of sheep is necessary for biosecurity and traceability - the current mob-based identification system is simple and proven to be effective.  Correctly filling out the accompanying NVD forms is essentail in making the current mob-based identification work at its best.

WoolProducers Australia supports the right of individual growers who chose to use electronic tags but has the position that mandatory electronic tagging would pose unnecesary cost and impose impracticalities. 

(photo credit: Megan Banks, Blackall QLD)

 

 

National Wild Dog Action Plan hits the ground running

Minister Barnaby Joyce during the launch


The Minister for Agriculture, the Honourable Barnaby Joyce, (picture by Emma Brown) has officially endorsed the National Wild Dog Action Plan and has announced the allocation of a $280,000 grant.

The money will be used for initiating the implementation of the plan as well as working with landholders tackling the problem of wild dogs. It is expected the initial phase of implementation will take up to 9 months, overseen by an appointed interim chair.

The team working on the implementation consists of representatives from the small and large production animal sectors, delegates from the Department of Agriculture and Vertebrate Pests Committee as well as a research and development corporations representative.

They will be supported by a stakeholder advisory group to be confirmed by the implementation team during July 2014.

Jim McKenzie, Chair of the Development Committee, said the next stage of the plan was going to be in good hands. "We are confident in handing over the implementation to this group, who between them have excellent on-the-ground management and dog experience, they really understand the devastation that wild dogs cause. The group is also committed to dealing with the very serious problem of wild dogs in a coordinated way.”

Geoff FiskenWoolProducers Australia President, Geoff Fisken, said, “Today is the culmination of a lot of hard work and the beginning of a new phase. I know these people who are looking after this next stage and they will be rolling up their sleeves to make sure that all the efforts that are currently going into wild dog management are capitalised on. You go to so many places in the bush and time and again, the thing that they will talk about as a huge problem is dogs.”

WoolProducers Australia identified a gap in the management of wild dogs, being a national coordinated approach where all states, territories and the Commonwealth work together, and initiated the consultation for the plan.

Much work is done by community groups, biosecurity groups, and regional environment groups to address this significant pest issue. The plan takes a nil-tenure approach. For example, wild dogs don’t abide by farm boundary lines or regional or state borders. Nil-tenure takes this into account and uses an overall landscape approach.

All state agriculture or environment ministers have signed off on the plan and the endorsement from the Federal Government makes this a first in pest management in Australia and a possible future model for tackling other pests.

Minister Joyce, said he was proud to be able to provide Federal support to launch this important Industry driven initiative.

“I am fully aware of just how big the issue of wild dogs can be for our primary producers – with an estimated cost of $48.5 million a year, wild dogs have a devastating impact on many farms across Australia. 

“It is not just the financial and environmental consequences of wild dogs that concern me; but also the emotional distress this problem causes farmers concerned for their livestock. It’s clear there is a real need for a coordinated approach to this issue and I congratulate WoolProducers Australia for taking such a leading role in developing the National Wild Dog Action Plan.”

National Wild Dog Action Plan

Media Release

 

Communication the key to tackling sheep disease in Tasmania

This You Tube video clip was produced by WoolProducers Australia and the Sheepmeat Council of Australia. It gives an overview of the rise of footrot as a serious issue for wool and sheep meat producers.  


British GQ's 25th Anniversary: Savile Row is Rock 'N' Roll

No one would question the fact that around the world Britain is celebrated both for unbeatable music and its unimpeachable menswear. So, to celebrate 25 years as the UK's best men's magazine, GQ has brought the two together in a unique photographic portfolio (in collaboration with The Woolmark Company). We've taken the exceptional performers who have rocked our world over the past quarter of a century and dressed them in Savile Row's finest bespoke tailoring with Merino wool fabrics from the very best British manufacturing wool mills. Just as British music today boasts its biggest ever share of the global market, right now the British menswear industry - from manufacture to design - has never been stronger. Welcome, friends, to the show that never ends...

Another cool wool story here...


WoolProducers Annual Review

WPA Annual Review 2013The WoolProducers Annual Review is launched during Wool Week and it serves to bring together industry perspectives from across the spectrum of wool production and marketing. WPA Annual Review 2013 E Zine.

The review is a contemporary account of the Australian wool industry by wool producers, for wool producers. It does this by compiling state reports from each of the six state farming organisations, who each contribute a director to the WPA board, plus reports from the WPA President and three Independent Directors. Report in the Weekly Times Friday 13 September. See the previous 2012 WoolProducers Annual Review 

Contact CEO Jane Brownbill at jbrownbill@woolproducers.com.au


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